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Studio Art Course Descriptions

ART 1000: TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (4 credits)

Introduction to the basic elements, principles and dynamics of visual art. Course features studio exercises and projects with exploration of two-dimensional art media and class critiques of studio work. Image-illustrated lectures, gallery visits, readings and critical writings supplement assigned studio problems as means of understanding concepts and acquiring skills in visual literacy and two-dimensional design. Required foundation course for studio art, visual art education majors and apparel design majors. Offered every semester.

ART 1010: THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (4 credits)

This foundation course is an introduction to the creation and understanding of three-dimensional form. Studio projects emphasize basic visual aesthetics, the principles and elements of spatial design and the processes and materials used to create sculptural forms. Three-dimensional design is also a preliminary course of study for architecture, furniture or product design, theater design, fashion design and many other disciplines. Image lectures, readings, critiques, gallery visits and written assignments supplement the course. Required foundation course for studio art, visual art education majors and apparel design majors. Offered every semester.

ART 1050: ART IN THE TWIN CITIES (4 credits)

Basic introduction to the study of visual art for non-majors. This art appreciation course emphasizes experiencing art directly and in-depth at museums and venues throughout the Twin Cities. Lectures will focus on themes and issues related to art including: the artist, the process of art and an overview of art history, visual culture and contemporary issues in art. Image lectures, discussions, readings, museum visits and written assignments. Offered in Weekend College.

ART 1200: DRAWING (4 credits)

Introduction to drawing focuses on drawing from observation and mastery of essential skills that includes a section on drawing from the human figure. Course presents art theory and studio practice leading to competence at the foundation level. Studio exercises, critiques and sketchbook assignments, supplemented by image lectures and readings. Required foundation course for studio art, visual art education majors and apparel design majors. Offered every semester.

ART 2000: JEWELRY (4 credits)

Introduction to the use of metal as an art medium and of three-dimensional design as applied to jewelry. Emphasis on developing skill with metalsmithing tools and basic techniques in fabrication. Formal and conceptual development will be explored within the context of historical and contemporary jewelry and metalwork production. Offered annually.

ART 2150:  COLOR (4 credits)

Basic principles and theories of color are explored in a hands-on sequence of assignments. Using paint as the primary medium, and introducing digital processes, color mixing skills are acquired that are important to the fine artist and designer, as well as to anyone interested in understanding the influence of color on the human psyche. Class procedures include demonstrations, illustrated lectures and critiques. Offered annually.

ART 2250: ART AND TECHNOLOGY (4 credits)

This course is an introduction to computers as a tool and digital culture as a medium for creative expression and communication. You will gain a hands-on understanding of graphic software and hardware in both object- and pixel-oriented programs. The class will consider the impact of computer technology on visual art and culture by means of online research and discussion. Using the computer as an art-making tool, you undertake projects that incorporate your own artistic expression. Class procedures include demonstrations, illustrated lectures and critiques. Required course for studio art, visual art education and art history majors. Offered every semester.

ART 2300: PAINTING: OIL (4 credits)

Exploration of the processes of painting with oil on canvas and other supports. Stresses practical knowledge of materials and experience in the use of the art elements, especially color, light and volume in compositions that employ various subject matter (including painting from the human figure). Exposes you to a variety of traditional and contemporary techniques in order to encourage the development of a personal vision. Image lectures, critiques. Offered annually.

ART 2310: PAINTING: ACRYLIC (4 credits)

Exploration of the processes of painting with acrylic on canvas and other supports. Stresses practical knowledge of materials and experience in the use of the art elements, especially color, light and volume in compositions that employ various subject matter (including painting from the human figure). Exposes you to a variety of traditional and contemporary techniques in order to encourage the development of a personal vision. Image lectures, critiques. Offered annually.

ART 2320: PAINTING: WATERCOLOR (4 credits)

Explore the methods of painting transparent watercolors on a variety of papers. You learn how to manipulate design elements and principles, especially color, in painting a variety of subjects. Personal expression and strong compositional strategies emphasized. Offered in the summer.

ART 2340: PRINTMAKING (4 credits)

Discover the world of multiple copies of the same image through printmaking. You will investigate woodcut, etching, and other printing techniques on a variety of surfaces to explore drawn images, pattern and surface design. Traditional and contemporary approaches and techniques will develop your ideas and personal imagery. Offered annually.

ART 2360: PHOTOGRAPHY I (4 credits)

This course offers an introduction to the basic skills of black and white photography, emphasizing both technique and the development of a creative visual vocabulary. Structured assignments develop a working knowledge of the 35mm camera and of the elements and principles of design. A self-directed final project encourages individual creativity. You must provide a 35mm SLR camera that allows for independent control over shutter speed and lens aperture and substantial film and paper supplies. Offered every semester.

ART 2400: WHEEL-THROWN POTTERY (4 credits)

In this introduction to the use of clay on the potter's wheel, pottery form and a range of surface treatments will be explored. You are given a historical, aesthetic and technical foundation for working with clay on the potter's wheel. Offered in the summer.

ART 2450: CLAY SCULPTURE (4 credits)

An introductory ceramics course, this class explores the possibilities of artistic expression in clay through hands-on experience. We will review the history of ceramics as well as look at contemporary artists as you learn a variety of hand-building techniques. You will be encouraged to go beyond learning the techniques toward developing your personal expression. Offered every semester.

ART 2500: SCULPTURE (4 credits)

Sculpture is the study of form, formation and transformation. In this introduction to sculptural form and space, process and material, you will explore the possibilities of idea and inspiration. You will be instructed in clay, wood, plaster, metal and mixed media as well as to installation and time-based art. Along with developing three-dimensional skills, you will be encouraged to begin developing your own sculptural aesthetic. Image lectures, field trips and readings. Offered annually. Prerequisites: Recommended: ART 1010.

ART 2550: SCULPTURE: METAL (4 credits)

In this introduction to the materials, processes, and forms of welded and cast sculpture, you will learn fabrication processes including welding, brazing, cutting, bending and metal casting, as well as finishing processes such as grinding and surface treatment. The possibility for sculptural exploration throughout the process will be emphasized as you work on independent projects. Studio work is supplemented with technical demonstrations, image lectures, readings, field trips and critical discussions. Offered occasionally. Prerequisites: Recommended: ART 1010.

ART 2600: FIGURE DRAWING (4 credits)

In-depth study in drawing the human figure, featuring concepts, anatomy, vocabulary and process, with exploration of materials and techniques and consideration of aesthetic and cultural issues in depicting the human body. Studio work is supplemented by readings and discussion, illustrated lectures, critiques, critical writing assignment and class visits to galleries and museums. Prerequisites: Some previous drawing experience.

ART 2982: TOPICS IN ART (2 credits)

The subject matter of this course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies from year to year but does not duplicate existing courses.

ART 2994: TOPICS (4 credits)

The subject matter of the course is announced in the annual schedule of classes. Content varies from year to year but does not duplicate existing courses. Topics may be either studio art courses or art history courses.

ART 3150: PUBLICATION AND COMPUTER DESIGN (4 credits)

This graphic design course offers hands-on computer experience in the major forms of printed communications: books, newspapers and magazines. Typography and the principles of visual communication integrating images and text are explored through exercises and projects. You are introduced to historical aspects and contemporary issues in the field as well as current software for layout design. Class procedures include demonstrations, illustrated lectures, critiques and field trips. Offered in rotation every third semester. Recommended: ART 2250.

ART 3180: ILLUSTRATION AND COMPUTER DESIGN (4 credits)

This graphic design course explores the concepts and techniques of communicating with images. Using appropriate software, you complete exercises and projects that introduce you to commercial practices, as well as develop your personal vision and style. Class procedures include demonstrations, illustrated lectures and critiques. Offered in rotation every third semester. Recommended: ART 2250 and/or ART 1000 or ART 1200.

ART 3200: GRAPHIC AND WEB DESIGN (4 credits)

Graphic design is the application of art and communication skills to the needs of society. Using computer software, the first part of the course is a comprehensive foundation in the conceptual, aesthetic and technical aspects of graphic design, including graphic identity. The second part builds on these skills to explore designing for the Internet using appropriate software. You execute exercises and projects. Class procedures include demonstrations, illustrated lectures and critiques. Offered in rotation every third semester. Recommended: ART 2250.

ART 3310: ADVANCED PAINTING (4 credits)

Continuation of ART 2300, 2310 or 2320 with greater independence, emphasizing development of a personal vision and style in painting. Offered every semester in conjunction with above courses. Prerequisites: ART 2300, 2310 or 2320.

ART 3350: ADVANCED PRINTMAKING (4 credits)

Advanced work in printmaking processes, investigating techniques learned in ART 2340 with photo applications and color printing. The development of a personal visual style will be encouraged along with traditional print editions. Offered annually in conjunction with ART 2340. Prerequisites: ART 2340.

ART 3360: PHOTOGRAPHY II (4 credits)

This intermediate-level course focuses on refining the skills and visual vocabulary introduced in ART 2360. Emphasis is placed on the development of content in student work using black and white materials. Techniques covered include traditional and digital processes. A semester-long project encourages individual creativity and the critical examination of issues in contemporary photography. An accomplished portfolio including an individualized final project must be presented at the end of the course. Students must provide their own 35mm camera and substantial film and printing supplies. Offered annually. Prerequisites: ART 2360 or other college-level introduction to photography course (students must be familiar with darkroom techniques and the use of the 35mm camera).

ART 3370: COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY (4 credits)

This course offers an introduction to the history and practice of color photography. A semester-long project encourages individual creativity and the critical examination of issues in contemporary photography. Although you continue to work with film, digital processes will be emphasized and incorporated throughout the course: working with Photoshop, scanning slides and negatives, making inkjet prints, and assembling images for on-screen display. An accomplished portfolio, including an individualized final project, must be presented at the end of the course. Students must provide their own 35mm and/or digital camera and substantial film and printing supplies. Offered annually. Prerequisites: ART 2360 or other college-level introduction photography course (students must be familiar with darkroom techniques and the use of the 35mm camera).

ART 3400: ADVANCED WHEEL-THROWN POTTERY (4 credits)

Continued exploration of ART 2400, using a broader range of clay bodies, surface treatments and firing techniques. You will develop a greater critical understanding and a personal vision. Offered in conjunction with ART 2400. Prerequisites: ART 2400.

ART 3450: ADVANCED SCULPTURE: CLAY (4 credits)

A continuation of ART 2450, you will focus on expanding your clay skills while continuing to develop and refine your individual ideas. You will also learn more about glazes and the firing process. Offered every semester in conjunction with ART 2450. Prerequisites: ART 2450.

ART 3500: ADVANCED SCULPTURE (4 credits)

Continued exploration and development of techniques, conceptual skills and content introduced in ART 2500 or ART 2550. You will explore your ideas more deeply and in virtually any medium, as well as refine your vocabulary and knowledge of contemporary sculptural practice. Image lectures, critiques, readings and writing assignments supplement the course. Offered annually in conjunction with ART 2500. Prerequisites: ART 2500 or 2550.

ART 4602 or 4604: INTERNSHIP (2 OR 4 credits)

Structured out-of-class learning experience that takes place on or off campus and includes a substantial work component. An internship involves you in a particular profession in an exploratory way to test career interests and potential. To initiate an internship experience, you must meet with the internship coordinator in the Career Development Office. Prerequisites: Faculty sponsorship and approval by department chair.

ART 4684: DIRECTED STUDY - STUDIO ART (4 credits)

Directed study is provided for students whose unusual circumstances prohibit taking a regularly scheduled course but who need the material of that course to satisfy a requirement. Availability of this faculty-directed learning experience depends on faculty time and may be limited in any given term and restricted to certain courses. Prerequisites: Faculty, department chair and dean approval.

ART 4800: SENIOR SEMINAR FOR STUDIO ART MAJORS (2 credits)

This course is an introduction to the resources and opportunities available to artists and designers to aid in their development as working professionals. Topics include portfolio preparation, resume writing, non-profit resources, exhibition opportunities, graduate studies and other strategies for making a living as an artist or designer. Course content takes the form of lectures, demonstrations, discussions and student presentations. Visiting artists and lecturers acquaint students with a range of challenges and opportunities faced by artists and designers working in several disciplines. You are required to critically examine your own work and the work of other students in order to clarify career goals and identify potential opportunities. Offered winter semester. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Portfolio Review II and approval of department chair.

ART 4850: SENIOR EXHIBITION (1 credits)

Preparation and exhibition of graduating studio art majors' artwork in the Catherine G. Murphy Gallery. Represents the culmination of major study for studio art majors, including those studying visual arts education. You must complete the Senior Exhibition within four years of finishing the other requirements for the studio art major. Offered winter semester only. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Portfolio Review II and approval of department chair.

ART 4952 or 4954: INDEPENDENT STUDY - STUDIO ART (2 OR 4 credits)

Independent studies presuppose a measure of experience in the area of study and the intent to go beyond the content of scheduled classes. Prerequisites: Faculty sponsorship and the department chair approval.

ARTH 1100: INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY: ANCIENT THROUGH MEDIEVAL (4 credits)

This course is an introduction to the history of Western art from prehistory through the Middle Ages. Beginning with the cave paintings of prehistoric France and Spain, this course surveys the visual arts and architecture of ancient Egypt and the ancient Near East, the Classical Greek and Roman worlds, and finally medieval Europe. It considers a variety of media (sculpture, pottery, wall painting, mosaics, and manuscripts as well as architecture) as meaningful expressions of their historical contexts. Questions surrounding how art and architecture function in society are explored throughout, and the basic principles of visual analysis are taught and utilized. Offered occasionally.

ARTH 1110: INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY: RENAISSANCE THROUGH MODERN (4 credits)

This course is an introduction to the history of Western art from the early Renaissance in Europe to the present in Europe and the U.S. It surveys the artists, architects, and art movements that constitute the canon of Western art since the Renaissance with an eye to examining how society influences artistic production and vice versa. The role of patronage, individual artistic personalities, religion, war and peace, and attitudes about gender are explored throughout. The basic principles of visual analysis are taught and utilized; students are also introduced to fundamental methods of art history such as iconography, formalism, and social art history. This course also includes a visit to, and analysis of an artwork in, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Offered annually.

ARTH 1150: WAYS OF SEEING (4 credits)

If the sense of sight is the primary means by which we experience the world, then how do what we believe and what we know determine how we see our culture and those different from our own? John Berger put this question to his readers in 1972 when he first published "Ways of Seeing." This course intends to bring Berger’s question to bear on the experience of art, history, and visual culture in the early 21st century. As an introduction to the history of the visual arts and culture, this course will also hone your visual and critical thinking skills. Specific and timely themes that cut across historical and geographical boundaries will narrow our focus through consideration of specific artists, artworks, buildings, and media images as well as relevant essays, books, and films on a given topic. These include, but are not limited to art and ideology, beauty and art, the female body and the gaze, piety and religious spaces, museums, art and illness, popular culture, consumer culture, and social change. Offered annually.

ARTH 2650: MODERN ART HISTORY (4 credits)

The major artists, movements, and ideas of modern art (primarily in Europe, but also in the U.S.) are investigated in this course. Beginning around 1880 and ending in the early 1950s, this course tracks the emergence and development of avant-garde movements such as Post-Impressionism, Fauvism and Expressionism, Cubism and Constructivism, Dada and Surrealism and finally Abstract Expressionism in New York. More specifically, it examines how gender, class, race and ethnicity influence artistic production while also exploring the impact of WWI and WWII on modern art. This is a writing-intensive and required course for studio art, visual art education and art history majors. Offered annually.