Social Studies

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Social Studies Course Descriptions

The social studies major is an interdisciplinary major, meaning that the course requirements for the major are selected from multiple academic departments.

ECON 2610: PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (4 credits)

The course gives an introduction to microeconomics: theory of the sfirm and the household, price determination, theory of production, income distribution, application of economic theory to current economic problems. Also offered in Weekend College. Prerequisites: High school algebra.

ECON 2620: PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (4 credits)

The course gives an introduction to macroeconomics: national income analysis, the problem of full employment and price stability, monetary and fiscal policies, international trade and finance, application of economic theory to current economic problems. Also offered in Weekend College. Prerequisites: High school algebra. Recommended: ECON 2610..

GEOG 2000: HUMAN (CULTURAL) GEOGRAPHY (4 credits)

The human population is incredibly varied. In this course, we study population distributions, variations, processes of change and migrations; cultural characteristics (ethnicity, language, religion) and the resulting landscapes; economic processes and land uses; and the architecture and complex features of towns, cities and metropolitan regions. You will be introduced to valuable concepts and perspectives of geography and learn about patterns and processes around the world. Offered annually. Also offered in Weekend College. Required course for elementary education majors and social studies majors seeking secondary education licensure. Open to all students.

HIST 1060: EUROPE SINCE 1800 (4 credits)

This course covers the 19th century; Concert of Europe; balance of power; Italian and German unification; the alliance system; World War I and disintegration of Europe; Fascist Italy, Nazi Germany, Soviet Russia; World War II; Cold War (the former U.S.S.R. vs. U.S.A.); nuclear confrontation; Vietnam War; Middle East crises (Arabs vs. Israel, Gulf War); disintegration of the Soviet Bloc; 1992 and reintegration of Europe. Offered annually.

HIST 1200: SURVEY OF U.S. POLITICAL AND SOCIAL HISTORY, 1600-1900 (4 credits)

This course is a survey of U.S. political and social history from the colonial era to 1900, with emphasis on the multiracial and multicultural aspects of the American experience. Also includes an overview of women's social and political roles and status from 1600 to the achievement of suffrage. Offered annually.

HIST 1300: INTRODUCTION TO U.S. HISTORIOGRAPHY (4 credits)

American history and historiography are used to illustrate various basic aspects of the historian’s craft and to teach you how to read and write about history critically. The course explores varieties of historical interpretation and methodologies, the relationship of thesis and fact in historical argument, the issues of audience and types of sources, and the various genres of history. Offered annually.

POSC 2010: AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (4 credits)

This course is an overview of governmental structures and political processes in the United States. It covers development of the federal system; nature of executive, legislative and judicial branches; mechanisms for popular participation; and contemporary policy issues.

POSC 2200: INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT (4 credits)

This course offers an examination of basic concepts of comparative politics such as political power, types of political systems and political development. It involves analysis of similarities and differences in the components of political systems: political culture, participation, leadership, interest groups, political parties, legislatures, executives, judiciaries and bureaucracy. Case studies of several major political systems, which may include Great Britain, France, Russia, Japan, China, India and Kenya, will be included.

PSYC 1001: GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (4 credits)

This course is an orientation to contemporary scientific psychology, including the study of learning and memory, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, biology and behavior, personality, individual differences, abnormal psychology, psychotherapy and developmental and social psychology. As a student in General Psychology in the baccalaureate day program you will participate in weekly laboratories. Offered every semester. Also offered in Weekend College and occasionally in summer.

PSYC 2025: LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (4 credits)

This course is a scientific study of development from prenatal life through late adulthood, with emphasis on the interplay of psychological processes, heredity and environment. This chronological review addresses physical, cognitive, social and emotional changes across the lifespan. In this course in the baccalaureate day program you will observe children in the campus Early Childhood Center or in a similar setting off campus. Offered every semester. Also offered in summer and in Weekend College. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001.

SOCI 1000: PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS OF SOCIOLOGY (4 credits)

Introduction to the basic ideas used by sociologists to understand societies, groups, relationships and the connection between the individual and the society. This course surveys the major topic areas of sociology, including culture, inequality, institutions, social interaction and social change, with application to current events and everyday life. Offered every semester. Also offered in Weekend College.

SOCI 3250: CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4 credits)

This is a survey of the evolution, integration and importance of culture. You will develop an awareness of and appreciation for the variety of human cultural and subcultural adaptations, focusing on such institutions as economics, family, politics and religion. Ethnographic methods are also covered, as you learn to recognize and interpret cultural meaning. Also offered as CRST and WOST. Offered annually.